My daughter and I were sitting in the kitchen, when I casually threw out the phrase: “rhetorical question” in conversation.

Suddenly, she reacted as if someone had scratched their fingernails down a chalkboard.

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With a smile, she admitted that misuse / overuse of the phrase is a current pet peeve of hers! Then, we enjoyed some friendly banter alternated with Google searches for the proper defining of “rhetorical question.”

Can you imagine having that as a pet peeve?*

[ Was that a rhetorical question*? see definition below. ]

I feel that my grievances are slightly more normal, but you may disagree:

  • Drips of dirty wet boot slush that stretch across a kitchen floor
  • Used dental floss and dental floss picks in places other than the garbage
  • Dryer lint left on top of the dryer
  • When people say “Aldi’s” instead of “Aldi” (Picky, I know)
  • Any song by Neil Diamond
  • An unnecessary apostrophe used in a word that happens to have an “S”. (Are you with me on that one, Sara?)

Speaking of literary terms, I experienced something rather ironic last night.

I was writing a health supplement article — late into the night. The article centered around melatonin, the hormone involved with the human sleep cycle. It’s fascinating how melatonin:

  • is produced when light decreases in one’s surroundings
  • is released by an amazing, intricate system in the body which includes the optic nerve sensing a lack of light and sending proper signals to the brain
  • is intertwined with our circadian rhythm of sleep and wakefulness

 

I will get to the irony, but I must interject here that reading and writing about melatonin and the intricate workings of the human body reminded me that:

My Creator is an unparalleled engineer, masterpiecing to the rhythms and designs He’s planted everywhere in His creation!

Now back to the irony:

I wrote far too late into the early morning hours — disrupting pools of melatonin, I’m sure.

And, after completing the article on sleep, I proceeded to have the worst night of sleep I’ve had in years. Cold toes, unsatisfying pillow placement, hearing mysterious noises — the whole works.

How ironic, eh?*

What’s your pet peeve? Perhaps your list includes: blog posts where people whine about a poor night’s sleep, don’t get to the point, or make lists of unsolicited facts about body chemicals? Or people who scatter dashes and ellipses like grass seed? Care to share?

*rhetorical question: a question asked in order to create a dramatic effect or to make a point rather than to get an answer.

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4 thoughts on “{ Rhetorical Question, Anyone? }

  1. My pet peeve word is “literally”… as in “I literally died laughing”. An ad for teeth implants stated they “literally put a smile her face”. Sure – a reason to smile, a nicer smile; but a smile isn’t something you can put on. Also, their, they’re and there used interchangeably online. Drives me nuts to hear something like “there’s 10 things to do today”. There “is” 10 things to do today? I looked up the contraction “there’re” and found that maybe people find it too hard to pronounce, and doesn’t look great in writing either. Fine: “there are” is easy enough.

    Other pet peeves – toilet paper roll put on “wrong”, toilet lid left up and talking and lit-up smartphones in movie theaters.
    Lisa – funny that one of your pet peeves is Neil Diamond songs because I love all of them!

    Liked by 2 people

  2. “Used dental floss and dental floss picks in places other than the garbage”–yes
    “An unnecessary apostrophe used in a word that happens to have an “S”. (Are you with me on that one, Sara?)” and YES!!!!!!!!!!
    Also, leaving dirty dishes on the counter when the dishwasher is empty/dirty.

    Liked by 2 people

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