{ Almost-Empty-Pantry Cake }

It’s Monday, and it appears that we diminished our food stockpile over the weekend.

I need to buy groceries.

Though the pantry is bare, we can still eat cake.

It won’t be bursting with fruit or chocolate, but with a patina of flavorful glaze, this dessert is sweetly satisfying (and easy to make.)

cake
I made my cake with coconut oil (didn’t have butter- used it all up over Thanksgiving) & I used water (didn’t have milk.) This is a stock photo. Ours looked similar. But, everyone ate it up before I remembered to take a photo.

Almost-Empty-Pantry Cake

Cake Ingredients:

  • 1 c sugar
  • ½ cup fat (butter, coconut oil, shortening)
  • 2 eggs, beaten
  • 2 tsp. vanilla
  • 1 ½ cup flour
  • 1 ¾ teaspoon baking powder
  • ½ cup milk or water

 

Glaze:

  • ½ – 1 cup confectioner’s sugar
  • Enough lemon juice whisked into the confectioner’s sugar to create a pourable glaze
  • If you don’t have lemon juice, use milk or water with a few drops of flavoring.

 

  1. Combine dry ingredients.
  2. Beat sugar and fat together. Add eggs, milk and vanilla.
  3. Mix dry ingredients with wet mixture.
  4. Place in greased 9 x 9 pan and bake at 350 degrees for approximately 30 minutes.
  5. When cake is cooled, pour glaze over.
  6. Eat and enjoy.
  7. Now go buy groceries.

 

© Lisa M. Luciano 😊

 

 

Less is more….creative.

They say that when you have less, you are forced to be more creative.

If you have unlimited art supplies, you think, “Where do I start?”

If you only have a package of flimsy paper plates and some brads, you brainstorm and come up with something unique…like a paper plate skeleton. 

Creativity also thrives in a sparse kitchen. Because we have a big family, our pantry is consistently on the verge of emptiness. This is the perfect environment for innovation.

One day I scrounged a little ham, some rice, cheese and a smattering of fresh and limp vegetables. Strategic marketing made this odd assortment into a memorable dish. I called it Nickelodeon Hash.

When my husband was out of work for several months, our refrigerator was often annoyingly barren. But lunch was never missed. Thinking outside the box one day,  I concocted a casserole of leftover black beans, salsa, rice, scrambled egg and cream cheese.

One spunky child named it “poverty in a pan.” With this innovative title, she proved that an environment of “less” can allow creative juices to flow abundantly.